NYC Department Of Education Putting Together First-Ever Social Media Policy - Including Facebook Restrictions

Sunday April 15, 2012 7:11 PM - 4 Comments

internet-websiteNew York City’s Department of Education is putting together its first-ever social media policy, but it’s not just aimed at students.

Facebook is turning out to be an occupational hazard for some teachers in the New York City public school system. Schools investigator Richard Condon told the New York Post that over the past 18 months they’ve had 120 complaints of city-school employees posting inappropriate comments on Facebook.

Some of the comments involved a teacher threatening to bring a gun to school and demeaning remarks about a parent. One teacher even got caught for calling out sick and then posting a picture of herself drinking a pina colada in San Juan, WCBS 880′s Monica Miller reported.

Under the new social media policy, schools chancellor Dennis Walcott has indicated that teachers may be barred from becoming Facebook friends with students on their personal pages.

{WCBS 880 NY/Matzav.com Newscenter}

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4 Responses to “NYC Department Of Education Putting Together First-Ever Social Media Policy - Including Facebook Restrictions”

1. Comment from Anonymous
Time April 15, 2012 at 7:24 PM

i think they should make an asifa

2. Comment from Avraham ben Avraham
Time April 16, 2012 at 2:48 AM

That will curb my ex-wife who seems to spend all her time at work on Facebook.

3. Comment from Avi
Time April 16, 2012 at 2:52 AM

This is a logical extension of the ban on personal relationships between teachers and students. Attempts to enforce it prospectively by requiring teachers to give principles their passwords would certainly lead to litigation.

4. Comment from Oldtimer
Time April 16, 2012 at 11:51 AM

There has got to be a limit to invasion of privacy. There are potential legal issues with employers checking employees’ Facebook pages, beyond the simple one of civilized behavior. Most people consider their Facebook page to be privileged in the same way that a private comversation is.

A teacher “friending” a student on Facebook is questionable, yes. However, there are online discussion groups for specific classes, and these are entirely in order. So is emailing a teacher to find out about assignments, etc. The line should be drawn at socializing.

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