Bringing a Choshuveh Talmud Chacham to Kever Yisroel


gravesEurope, 1946.  After the incineration of European Jewry, a man turns his sights to American shores.  Physically broken, he is forced to turn his back on the ashes of his entire family, his hometown, and the only life he ever knew.  Arriving penniless and alone, he clings to his unshakeable faith in his Creator, deriving solace from the precious words of the heilige Torah.  

Life in America is difficult.  Grappling with the nightmares of his past, he marries and strives to rebuild a family.  Financial difficulties and secular forces in America make life a daily struggle.  However, through it all, his Torah learning sustains him, breathing life into his mundane daily existence.

America, October, 2010.  Now elderly and alone once again, the man’s Torah is still his constant companion and comfort.  Although his son has turned his back on his frum upbringing, this talmid chochom continues to spend his waning days laboring over his precious seforim.  

When this unassuming elderly man fails to show up in shul or in shops around the neighborhood, barely anyone notices.  Before too much time has elapsed, an old friend suddenly realizes that he hasn’t seen his friend recently.  Unable to make contact, he calls the old man’s irreligious son with his concerns, which prove to be valid.  He learns that after a brief stay in the hospital, his friend’s holy neshama was returned to his Creator. The siyata dishmaya here is evident. Had the friend had not reached out, we would not learn about this niftar in time.

Even in death, however, peace does not come easily to this long-suffering talmid chacham.  His son transfers the niftar to a local funeral parlor to be cremated, believing that this is the most fitting way for his father to greet his martyred parents, who had been cremated by the Nazis.  He also cites financial reasons, claiming that he does not have the funds for a Jewish burial.

Concerned friends contact Misaskim, who immediately begin negotiating with the son and the non-Jewish funeral parlor.  After days of exhausting discussions, Misaskim agrees to provide compensation for the cancelled cremation, related costs, and all expenses for a proper Jewish burial. Thus, the holy meis is rescued from the indignities of cremation.

Once again, however, new problems arise.  The niftar did not own a burial plot, and since he lived in a city far from the NY metropolitan region, it was impossible to utilize Misaskim’s own burial plots or the services offered by The Hebrew Free Burial Society, one of Misaskim’s magnificent partners in our avodas hakodesh.  Faced with the staggering costs of paying for a burial plot, in addition to the costs of the Jewish funeral home and kvurah, Misaskim nevertheless goes ahead and is b”h zocheh to escort the holy niftar to his well-deserved rest.

Now, fellow yidden, we need your help.  In order to reimburse the parties involved, we must raise $11,500 by next Monday, November 8th.  Please take part in this tremendous mitzvah by donating generously to this holy cause.  Grab the opportunity to honor an unassuming talmid chacham who never received honor or recognition during his lifetime.  In this zchus, may Klal Yisroel be shielded from any more suffering and pain.     

To donate click here or call (718) 854-4548.

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  1. Stop this double talk! What is this individuals name? If he was takaa so Chashuv, why can’t we know who it was? When you attach a name, it lends credibility.

  2. #2: That would be loshon horoh in its worst form! Why do you need to know a name? It’s enough to know that a yid needs to be brought to kever yisroel instead of being cremated, ch”vsh. The credibility comes from the fact that Misaskim has already laid out the money, and they are about as credible as any organization can possibly be.