Deri: Reform Are Provocateurs

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Presiding over a Knesset question and answer session, Interior Minister Aryeh Deri of Shas was recently asked why the Reform movement isn’t tolerated in Israel. Why not show them consideration, particularly after they agreed to a Kosel compromise?

“What do they want from the Kosel?” Deri replied. “We daven for the Bais Hamikdash to be built so that sacrifices will be offered, that there should be a lishchas hagozis. But they don’t believe in this. So why do they come to the Kosel? What do they get from it? They only want to arouse provocation and national disunity. They are intentionally trying to destroy tradition in all Jewish matters.

“The Reform are our brothers but cause great harm to Judaism,” Deri noted. “I was in Carmiel on Shabbos. My hosts, traditional Jews, showed me a building built by order of the High Court as a Reform synagogue. They told me that on Yom Kippur they brought trampolines there for kids as well as booths for soft drinks and candy.”

Adding that the two Reform synagogues accompanied their services with a guitar and organ, Deri asked: “So I ask you: is this the Judaism you want to encourage? If this is Judaism, I’m happier without it.”

Meanwhile, Anat Hoffman, head of Women of the Wall, wrote to Rav Hakosel Shmuel Rabinovich demanding for a large menorah to be set up in the ezras noshim during Chanukah or for the Kosel menorah lighting ceremony to take place in the Kosel’s upper plaza, where women are allowed in accordance with the opinion of Deputy Attorney General Dina Zilber, who ruled last year that excluding women from the Kosel lighting was unacceptable discrimination.

{Matzav.com Israel News Bureau}

3 COMMENTS

  1. Last year on the first night of Chanukah, the Women of the Wall brought menorahs into the Ezras Nashim. Not having tables to put them on, they placed them on the floor. Some of them were less than a foot high. This goes against halacha which says that they cannot be placed less than 10.5 inches from the floor and ideally should be 10 tefachim (approximately 35 inches) above the floor. When I saw the picture of the menorahs on the floor and the Women of the Wall surrounding them, I was shocked, as one would never put a small menorah on the floor of one’s home. A fortiori (all the more so) at the Kotel. For shame!

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