Greenfield’s Law Slows Down Drivers Near Schools

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greenfield-deblasioBrooklyn, NY – Crucial traffic safety legislation introduced by Councilman David G. Greenfield was signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday, at PS 152 in Queens, where 8-year-old Noshat Nahian was killed by a tractor-trailer in December while walking to school. Councilman Greenfield’s bill is an essential piece of New York City’s Vision Zero traffic initiative. Vision Zero will enhance traffic data collection and enforcement efforts, codify safety engineering commitments, and update the city’s legal code to enhance the penalties for hazardous driving.

Councilman Greenfield’s law, Local Law 24, reaffirms our city’s commitment to safer streets, by establishing 50 new “slow zones” per year near schools and creating 7 new neighborhood slow zones at the request of the community. A longtime activist for traffic issues and safety at City Hall, the Councilman has spurred the recent efforts to reduce speeds citywide. Thanks to his dedicated advocacy, Albany lawmakers heeded the Councilman’s call, granting the city more authority to control its own roads and set speed limits.

“It’s not every day that you get to pass laws that will literally save lives,” said Councilman David G. Greenfield. “We have more children and seniors living in our community than just about any other in New York City. The fact is that by slowing down, we will literally save our friends’ and neighbors’ lives.”

Approximately 250 people are killed and 4,000 are seriously injured every year in traffic crashes, the majority of which are pedestrians.

Councilman Greenfield has also urged the NYPD to increase the number of school crossing guards at dangerous street corners and asked the city to add important safety measures like more pedestrian countdown signals and flashing warning lights to warn large trucks of low underpasses.

Greenfield’s legislation will establish 50 “school slow zones” of up to 1,300 feet from the entrance or exit of a school. At designated “school slow zones,” the speed will be no less than 15 mph and no more than 20 mph. In addition to the 50 “school slow zones,” seven more “neighborhood slow zones,” no more than 5 blocks long, will be established, designating the speed limit at 20 mph.

If you have a recommendation on a school that you would like to see included in this new “slow zone” initiative, please call Councilman Greenfield’s office at (718) 853-2704.

{Matzav.com Newscenter}

4 COMMENTS

  1. As a parent whose child was hit by a car I know the feeling of hazolah ringing your bell to take you to the hospital. However if the politicians were really interested in vision zero they should also focus on pedestrians. Firstly I can’t understand why there is no mention of reflective belts. Especially in our neighborhoods where we dress black and then you have the rain coats we wear in the rain 2) There should be enforcement (not jaywalking)of standing in crosswalks when the cars have green lights. Don’t put the whole problem on the drivers

  2. Please improve the lighting from street lamps! They emit such low levels of light and it makes it very hard to see pedestrians – not only those dressed in black!

  3. Right, because it wasn’t enough that he killed the deal Felder had with the sanitation dept. not to have collections just before school; which makes it a nightmare to drive kids to school; now show things down more.

  4. Right, because it wasn’t enough that he killed the deal Felder had with the sanitation dept. not to have collections just before school; which makes it a nightmare to drive kids to school; now slow things down more.

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