Hikind Says 10-Cent Surcharge On Plastic/Paper Bags Burdens Families



Assemblyman Dov Hikind (D-Brooklyn) is strongly opposed to a proposed amendment to the administrative code of the city of New York that will force many retailers to charge a 10-cent fee to customers for every carryout bag they receive when making their purchases. While the bill’s intention is to reduce the use of carryout bags, which the bill’s proponents say will help the environment, Assemblyman Hikind says the proposed legislation will do more harm than good and while immediately hurting individuals and families.

“I am pleased that both of the NY City Council Members who represent constituents in my district have come out opposed to this law,” said Hikind. “We are all concerned about the environment but there are numerous other ways to address those concerns. The best way isn’t adding one more regular fee to our community members’ expenses. Things are already financially difficult. Why not encourage recycling with a discount to community members who choose to reuse carry out bags?

“If the litter caused by these bags is really a consideration, then let’s pursue stiffer littering penalties. But don’t penalize the average family who goes shopping once a week and brings home 15 or 20 bags of groceries. The last thing people with fixed incomes need is another expense”

Assemblyman Hikind noted that provisions in the proposed legislation protect low-income families receiving benefits under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from the proposed legislation, but it does not offer relief to other low-income workers or seniors who are not receiving such benefits.

“Our families are already struggling,” said Hikind. “They don’t need additional expenses. There are other ways to help the environment.”

{Andy Heller-Matzav.com Newscenter}


  1. The hidden cost is being kept secret.


    In the San Fernando Valley, as the Los Angeles Daily News reports, theft is on the rise. It’s simple: Now that more people have reason to carry their own bags to shop, thieves can stash items in their own totes, then merely apologize and say it was an oversight if they get caught. (Without proving intent, it’s hard to make a commercial burglary charge stick.)

    Leave it to overregulation to make crime easier by banning once-legal activity.