Lakewood Adds More Water Piping to Keep Up With Phenomenal Communal Growth


lakewood-smallThe primary water provider in Lakewood, NJ, has just finished laying down nearly 2.5 more miles of water piping, foreshadowing more development in this ever-expanding town.

Since April, New Jersey American Water has installed almost 13,000 feet of pipe in the downtown area, which, while virtually built out, is starting to see high-rises sprouting up that will need stronger water pressure.

The new water main will supplement some 12,500 people who already use well water from the Manasquan Reservoir, American Water Spokesman Richard Barnes said.

“This transmission main will supply our customers with water during periods of high demand and provide them with increased water pressure,” Suzanne Chiavari, a vice president of engineering for American Water, said in a prepared statement.

The $2.1 million project is proof of Lakewood’s “phenomenal growth” that isn’t expected to let up anytime soon, said Steven Reinman, Lakewood’s director of economic development. Reinman formed an infrastructure planning group about six months ago to look at preparations for further expansion.

“We can’t be in the position we are now in some places where it’s impossible to do anything because of the lack of infrastructure,” he said.

The added main runs along Brook Road to Seventh Street, down Monmouth Avenue, across Lexington Avenue and ends at Clifton Avenue. Barnes said the roads have been patched and are drivable, with further restoration to be done in the fall.

American Water has about 130 total miles of main and six well stations in Lakewood, Barnes said.

About 20 percent of the public water supply in the northern coastal area, including Lakewood, still comes from wells.

{Zach Patberg-APP}



  1. Some people needed the water in order for certain pet projects can move forward with utilities, the developer gets more units to the acre.

  2. #1
    Stop being so cynical! Live & let live! Growth is good & its been many years since Lakewood has had zoning laws like the surrounding towns. Current developers are not the reason that they fit more units per acre. We need more water anyway. So what if a few developers take advantage of it!! U sound like the bitter child that got the smaller piece of cake!!