Man Charged $23,148,855,308,184,500 For One Pack Of Cigarettes

18

marlboro-cigarettesA New Hampshire man says he swiped his debit card at a gas station to buy a pack of cigarettes and was charged over 23 quadrillion dollars. Josh Muszynski checked his account online a few hours later and saw the 17-digit number – a stunning $23,148,855,308,184,500 (twenty-three quadrillion, one hundred forty-eight trillion, eight hundred fifty-five billion, three hundred eight million, one hundred eighty-four thousand, five hundred dollars).  Muszynski says he spent two hours on the phone with Bank of America trying to sort out the string of numbers and the $15 overdraft fee.The bank corrected the error the next day. Bank of America tells WMUR-TV only the card issuer, Visa, could answer questions.

Visa, in turn, referred questions to the bank.

{NY Daily News/Matzav.com Newscenter-Noam Amdurski}

18 COMMENTS

  1. It’s a good thing the store owner wasn’t hareidi, or they would’ve blaimed the gdolim for not reigning in such obvious thievery from a poor guy trying to buy a pack of cigs.

  2. “Recently several Visa card holders were, um, overcharged for certain purchases, to the tune of $23,148,855,308,184,500.00 on a single charge. The company says it was due to a programming error, and that the problem has been corrected. What is interesting is that the amount charged actually reveals the type of programming error that caused the problem. 23,148,855,308,184,500.00 * 100 (I’m guessing this is how the number is actually stored) is 2314885530818450000. Convert 2314885530818450000 to hexadecimal, and you end up with 20 20 20 20 20 20 12 50. Most C/C++ programmers see the error now … hex 20 is a space. So spaces were stuffed into a field where binary zero should have been.”

  3. Hmmm2000 writes
    “Recently several Visa card holders were, um, overcharged for certain purchases, to the tune of $23,148,855,308,184,500.00 on a single charge. The company says it was due to a programming error, and that the problem has been corrected. What is interesting is that the amount charged actually reveals the type of programming error that caused the problem. 23,148,855,308,184,500.00 * 100 (I’m guessing this is how the number is actually stored) is 2314885530818450000. Convert 2314885530818450000 to hexadecimal, and you end up with 20 20 20 20 20 20 12 50. Most C/C++ programmers see the error now … hex 20 is a space. So spaces were stuffed into a field where binary zero should have been.”
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