Muhammad Top Name for Baby Boys in Britain


babyThe most popular boys’ name in England and Wales last year was Muhammad, according to an ONS poll. The research officially lists Oliver as the most popular boys name, with 6,949 counts, but the way the names are organized means each different spelling of Muhammad is listed separately.

When all the variations are added together, including Muhammad, Mohammed and Mohammad, the name comes out top with 7,445 counts.

Oliver replaced Harry as the second most popular name given to baby boys, while George jumped up to tenth place.

Multi-cultural London and the West Midlands contained the most babies named Muhammad, while Oliver came out top in the South East, South West and Wales.

Last year also saw George jump into the 10 most popular boys names, following the birth of Prince George to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in July.

Royal names Willilam, Harry and George now occupy three of the top 10 spots in the boys’ name league table.

Other popular choices included Theon, with 11 baby boys named after Theon Greyjoy, 11 children named Gregor, possibly after Gregor Clegane – otherwise known as The Mountain- and five being named after Sansa Stark.

While connections to Royalty remains popular with the public, new parents appear to want to shield their children from comparisons to politicians. The name ‘Cameron’ was one of the biggest fallers – dropping 16 places in a year and 70 places since 2003.

For boys Oscar and George replaced Alfie and Riley in the top 10 most popular names, climbing from number 17 to 7 and number 12 to 10 respectively. Poppy replaced Lily in the top 10 most popular names for girls, climbing from number 13 to 7.

There were six new entries in the 100 most popular boys’ names in 2013 – including Teddy, up 55 places to 86, Ibrahim up 18 places from 107, and Ronnie which entered at number 90 – up 15 places from 105.

Felix, Austin and Albert also make the top 100. These replaced Rhys, Ellis, Kayden, Bailey, Taylor and Kyle which fell out of the top 100.

Read more at THE DAILY MAIL.

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