New High-End Kosher Superstores Make it in Less Than 10,000 Square Feet


supermarketThere was a time that when you said the word “supermarket,” you were probably referring to a store in large space of some 18,000 – 35,000 square feet. Indeed, many of the new high end relatively new kosher supermarkets (i.e. Pomegranate, Gourmet Glatt, Evergreen) are within the limits of the lower number, but increasingly many are designing stores with a high end look that have as little as 8,500 or 10,000 square feet. Two Boro Park stores are a good example.

The new Breadberry on 60th Street and the redesigned Goldberg’s on 18th Avenue convey the upscale gourmet look but manage to do so in smaller space than the well-known larger stores. Taking design cues from other gourmet kosher markets, such as Zabar’s and perhaps Gourmet Glatt, Breadberry’s look is a sleek combination of glass and steel in orange and white colors. For the grand opening, last week, the supermarket was covered in bunches of orange and white balloons, adding an extra air of festivity to the hundreds of opening day guests.

Breadberry makes use of an efficient space, with all the basics, along with the bells and whistles, arranged in a non-intimidating, easy to navigate store. There is nothing missing from the Breadberry experience despite its smaller size, which includes a cheese section, fresh produce selection, fishery, sushi, butcher, take out, pickling station, and hot table. The meat section offers an elegant typed menu with a variety of hot sandwiches to choose from, carved in your presence from choice cuts of meat and deli. The Sushi chefs create unique dishes, including the already-popular sushi sandwiches, as well as any other dish you can think of to request. Breadberry’s atmosphere is relaxed and welcoming, complete with special “kiddie carts”- mini shopping carts to keep the kids involved. Cashiers are friendly and efficient. The snack aisle features a mini candy store, with a large selection of candy dispensers.

Breadberry’s young owner Samuel Gluck has been dreaming about such a store for at least a decade, according to his classmate from yeshiva who now works for him. Why the name Breadberry? Mr. Gluck is a fan of artisan breads and top of the line pastries that are filled by Schreiber’s a popular and growing network of pastry stores.

In the midst of its extensive renovations, Goldberg’s too has a full complement of sections that in many ways mimic the Breadberry experience. Mr. Goldberg says that his redone store is all about the shopping experience, which in his case is 24 hours, sans late Fridays and Shabbos. Although still a work in progress, it is already clear that Goldberg’s and Breadberry will offer Boro Park shoppers a new level of store that was only a dream a decade earlier, in both Mr. Gluck’s and Mr. Goldberg’s minds. Parking and storage space is still a problem for both, but the store owners say that they are working on solutions.


{ Newscenter}


  1. So sad that yidden are taking the gashmius and raising it to even higher levels of… gashmius. What ever happened to providing better quality kashrus? cheaper prices? Do we not have a Yom Tov this week that is all about accepting the Torah, living for Torah and making that the reason we are here. Isnt the whole point of the gashmius in order to raise the ruchnius. This certainly isnt doing that.