Police Shut Down Bnei Brak Wedding Due to Claim of Late, Loud Music

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Police raided a wedding in Bnei Brak this week due to noise complaints, marring the simcha.

On Wednesday, at a wedding at the Heichalei Malchus Hall on Rechov Shlomo Hamelech in Bnei Brak, at about 3 a.m., during the mitzvah tantz, policemen entered the hall, stating that neighbors complained about the noise of the music.

The police demanded that the music be stopped. They first sought out the baal simcha, and when they could not identify him, they approached the keyboardist and told him to turn the music down. The musician went outside to speak with the police.

While the musician was having a conversation with the police, the music was turned up again. The policemen returned inside, livid, declaring that they wish to see the person who turned up the music. They identified him as the event’s photographer, Yaakov Gross.

Gross said that the police had no justification for shutting down the wedding.

“The hall is located in an industrial area, so noise regulations do not apply to it,” said Gross. “This is well known. It was completely legal.”

The police decided to detain the cameraman along with the musician.

Gross and the musician were taken to the police station in Ramat Gan, where they were detained for half an hour, and each received a fine of NIS 350 for causing noise.

“The charges, of course, will be reversed,” said Gross, “because it is ridiculous, but it ruined the joy of a chosson – a yasom, in fact – and his kallah.”

Gross returned to the hall at the end of the mitzvah tzantz and took some family photographs.

According to Gross, at the end of the event, the cleaning crew told him that the “police come here a lot.”

Israeli police later tried to justify the raid, saying that “the law regarding noise refers to any place, without any demarcation. And anyone present at the scene of the offense is responsible for the crime of excessive noise.”

David Steger – Matzav.com Israel

3 COMMENTS

  1. “Police raided a wedding in Bnei Brak this week due to noise complaints, marring the simcha.”

    No, the simcha was marred by blasting music at 3AM, and by the photographer acting like a you-know-wwhat and turning the music back up.

    ““The hall is located in an industrial area, so noise regulations do not apply to it,” said Gross.”
    Kishmoi, kein hu. The hall is across the street from an old age home and half a block from another. See google maps https://www.google.com/maps/@32.0789841,34.8390304,3a,75y,17.94h,74.58t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sKQzvxj7ZlCTNsLHWne3qTA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1 and click to look up and down the street.

  2. Music at weddings are always way, way too loud. The only people attending weddings that are actual enjoying the cacophony are the youngsters who are too reckless to realize how much damage it is causing to the eardrums of the attendees.

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