Rev. Jeremiah Wright Apologizes for Statements About Blaming “Them Jews”


jeremiah-wright1The Rev. Jeremiah Wright, the former pastor at Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ and President Obama’s former spiritual leader, got into another jam this week.
In an interview with David Squires, a columnist from the Newport News, Va. Daily Press, Wright blamed “them Jews” for keeping him from talking to President Obama. Wright then made it worse by saying in another interview he meant “Zionists.” But on Friday he said he “misspoke” and issued an apology.”Them Jews ain’t going to let him talk to me,” Wright originallysaid. “I told my baby daughter that he’ll talk to me in five years when he’s a lame duck, or in eight years when he’s out of office.” He added: “They will not let him to talk to somebody who calls a spade what it is. I said from the beginning. He’s a politician, I’m a pastor. He’s got to do what politicians do.”

Wright, discussing his comments with Sirius/XM radio’s host Mark Thompson on “Make it Plain,” may have thought he issued a clarification–certainly no apology–but only added to the damage.

Said Wright, “I’m not talking about all Jews, all people of the Jewish faith, I’m talking about Zionists… I’m talking about facts, historical facts. I’m not talking about emotionally charged words.

“They can jump on that phrase if they want to,” he said, “but they can’t undo history and they can’t undo the fact of Jewish historians and Jewish theologians who write about what’s going on.”

On Friday, the Daily Press reported that Wright posted a statement on his Facebook page.

Wrote Wright, “I am extremely disturbed and deeply saddened that once again my comments as reflected in the June 10, 2009, Daily Press article has resurfaced a divisive debate about my relationship with President Barack Obama. I love President Obama as my son, and support and honor him as the President of the United States of America and leader of the free world. I apologize to the Jewish community and all others who were offended by the way in which I framed my comments. I misspoke. I meant no harm or ill-will to the American Jewish community or the Obama Administration. My great respect for the Jewish faith and the foundational (and central) part of my Judeo Christian tradition are unquestionable, and I pray that all whom I have hurt accept my sincerest apology.”

{Chicago Sun-Times/ Newscenter}