Scary Stuff: 2,000 NY Bridges, Including Brooklyn Bridge, Are Structurally Deficient


brooklyn-bridgeMore than 2,000 New York state bridges, including the Brooklyn Bridge, have been deemed structurally deficient and in dire need of repairs by the federal government.

An Associated Press review of 607,380 bridges in the federal government’s National Bridge Inventory found that 65,605 of them are structurally deficient. New York state leads the pack.

Hundreds of bridges in Connecticut have also made the list, and state officials are exploring the possibility of implementing tolls for the first time in decades to help come up with the billions of dollars needed to repair or replace the aging spans.

A bridge deemed structurally deficient is considered to be in need of rehabilitation or replacement because at least one major component of the span has advanced deterioration or other problems that lead inspectors to deem its condition “poor” or worse. According to the most recent data, 20,808 bridges are deemed “fracture critical,” meaning they don’t have redundant protections and are at risk of collapse if a single, vital component fails.

Some 7,795 bridges nationwide fall into both categories – a combination of red flags that experts say is particularly problematic. More than 400 of these are in New York state.

The list includes the Brooklyn Bridge, which is undergoing a four-year, $500 million reconstruction. Completed in 1883, the suspension span over the East River is being updated for about 120,000 vehicles and thousands of pedestrians crossing daily.

Read more at CBS NEW YORK.

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  1. You get what you pay for. You don’t want to pay taxes? You don’t get your bridges fixed. Steel costs money. Concrete costs money. You pay or you don’t play. Donald Trump isn’t going to buy the bridge for you (although he might try to sell you one).

  2. My only question is why after these bridges have been under perpetual construction and shut downs for as long as anybody can remember, are they still in such bad shape.

  3. problem is, diverting drivers fees/tolls to mass transit. if those were used for maintaining roads & bridges, there would be more than enough money.