Senator Lieberman To Address “Religion and Democracy,” And His New Book On Shabbos, At YU


joe-lieberman-shabbosSenator Joseph Lieberman will discuss religion and democracy, his historic political career and his new book,¬†The Gift of Rest: Rediscovering the Beauty of the Sabbath in a wide-ranging, one-on-one conversation with Yeshiva University’s Rabbi Dr. Meir Soloveichik on Wednesday, August 31.

The event, which begins at 6:30 p.m. in Lamport Auditorium on YU’s Washington Heights campus, and is open to the public, serves as the first in a series of “Great Conversations on Religion and Democracy” convened by the Zahava and Moshael Straus Center for Torah and Western Thought at Yeshiva. It takes place on the first day of classes in the fall semester and marks the formal beginning of Yeshiva University’s academic year.

Rabbi Soloveichik, the director of the Straus Center, explained that “because Senator Lieberman has always been proud of the role that his faith, and Torah observance, plays in his own historic career, he is the perfect person to discuss the role of faith in public life before the students of Yeshiva University. We are honored that the Senator will join us for what we expect will be an unforgettable evening as we ponder how Jewish ideas have changed the world and how they can continue to do so in the future.”

{Noam  Newscenter}


  1. I greatly admire Senator Lieberman. however, the new book is more a “michshol” than a benefit in regards to Shabbos. he describes how he decides whether to mechallel shabbos> Alot is his “feeling”. he does not need to discuss and a sk a shaila for each case. he got general guidelines from a Rabbi. How a person who has very little knowledge of Shulchan Orech due to a limited jewish education feel he can pasken dinei chilul shabbos on his own.

    I am afraid others will emulate him and pasken on his own, especially since the book has the haskama of the OU.

  2. Does the frum world follow the news?!
    Who pushed for the overturning of “Don’t ask, Don’t tell” none other than Sen. Joe.Admit it , on virtually every issue Judaism and he are on opposing sides.

    If he is someone you admire,I hope I am someone who you do not.

  3. Meir: Most tzadikim are not well known. Many reshoyim are well known. Being well known is not necessarily a good thing, if what he is being remembered for is a bad thing.