Seven Mile Market Opens in Baltimore

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seven-mile-market-in-baltimoreBy Isaac Draiman

“Beautiful, Amazing,” is what everyone is saying at the new Seven Mile Market, which¬†opened today at the previous site of Safeway on Reisterstown and Old Milford Mill Roads.Upon entering the store, customers are greeted by a friendly associate, handing out maps of the store. The first impressions are truly striking – beautiful, wide, sparkling clean aisles, bright lighting, and soft music playing in the background. The produce department is a true wonder – wide aisles boasting large and attractive produce displays. Mrs. Chana Gerstein was shopping with her children and commented, “It just seems very calm. The wider aisles here make it so easy to shop – even with kids.”

The mood is very upbeat, as shoppers and store employees are walking around with big smiles on their faces, taking it all in. Mrs. Maxine Rottenberg, veteran Seven Mile shopper and current store employee, called it “Beautiful, wonderful, terrific. My daughter came here this morning, and she also thought it was wonderful!” One shopper called the store, “a real kiddush Hashem,” and Mrs. Menucha Caplan called it “Amazing,” as she reminisced about going to the original Jack’s on Park Circle with her mother, many years ago.

Mr. Simcha Retter, manager, commented, “Baruch HaShem, the day is going very well and it has been a happy, successful transition. We have had a few glitches, such as the fact that not all the prices are marked or registered in the system. We have between seven thousand and ten thousand new items, and they are not all entered properly in the system yet.”

When asked if the store saw more customers today than on a typical Tuesday morning, Mr. Retter replied, “We definitely have more customers. And we are also seeing new customers – customers that don’t seem to have shopped with us before, from a larger spectrum of the community.”

Mrs. Rose Miller, who has been shopping with the store “for fifty years,” commented, “It is just gorgeous! I can’t get over it!” “There are definitely lots of people here and the parking lot was pretty full, but it does not feel like it as there is so much room, ” commented Mrs. Andrea Shulman. Mrs. Liza Mogilevskaya called the new store “good for the Jewish people,” and David Piles, buyer for Seven Mile Market, called it “a big day for the community.”

Ilona Kirnos, formerly of Flower and Gifts in Pikesville, is the store’s new florist. She has already sold lots of bouquets, and is looking forward to selling many more as Shabbos gets closer. “People are very excited that they can order a bouquet, go do their shopping, and then come back and pick it up.”

After the shopping is finished, one can now push his/her cart out to the car, and load the groceries right in. However, Lamont, who has been helping us with our groceries for the past eight years, is still outside, waiting to continue serving us.

{Baltimore Jewish Life/Matzav.com}

8 COMMENTS

  1. Reb hershel is a tremendous baal chessed and baal tzedka, without any air about him.he deserves all this hatzlacha hashem should continue to shower him with success!

  2. I was a student at Ner Israel in the late sixties and early seventies, and had the opportunity to shop at your father’s store on Reisterstown near the plaza. I believe you are the one who introduced me to putting mustard on a cheese sandwich. Mazel Tov and Bracha Vehatzlacha on your new store.

  3. DOES ANYONE KNOW WHY CHOLOV YISROEL PRIDE OF THE FARM MILK IS MORE EXPENSIVE IN BALT THEN IN LAKEWOOD WHEN ITS PRODUCED BY A BALT COMPANY. WHY IS EMPIRE CHICKEN HIGHER IN BALTIMORE THEN IN NEW YORK WHEN ITS CLOSER TO BALTIMORE. YES HAPPY CUSTOMERS WHEN THEY CAME IN BUT NOBODY TOOK COMMENTS WHEN THEY LEFT

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  4. Everyone knows that if you live in Baltimore there are 2 things you’ll have to put up with: carpools and seven mile market. Yes, its frustrating to only have one store. I grew up in Monsey where there’s a grocery every few blocks and that keeps the prices low. Whenever we go back to Monsey we never leave without stocking up on groceries. We also take a shopping list from our neighbors and they in turn do that for us when they go to Lakewood, Brooklyn or Monsey. There’s also a much larger variety of foods in Monsey and 7 mile frequently runs out of certain products and then we have to scramble to find someone to bring it in from the NY area. I think they should offer free delivery like most stores in the tri-state area. But seven mile does a lot of chesed for the community and considering that they don’t have competition I think they try their best to keep things as fair as possible under the circumstances. Its one of the quirks of living oot!

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