Shatnez Alert: Hong Kong Custom Tailors


shatnez-smallHong Kong custom tailors often reassure their Jewish clientele that they are familiar with shatnez and that their suits are free of shatnez.

Can a consumer rely on the promises of the tailor?

The adjacent picture shows a nametag affixed to the lining of a Hong Kong tailor-made men’s suit. The customer repeatedly requested assurance from the tailor that no linen be used in the suit. When the suit finally arrived the customer had the suit shatnezchecked for shatnez at the Lakewood Shatnez Laboratory. To his dismay, the interlining of the collar was linen.

{Dovid Newscenter}


  1. People generally understand that when it comes to a question of an issur de’oraisa there is no halachic ne’emanus to an eino Yehudi.

    Therefore, for example, we do not rely on an eino Yehudi if he tells us “don’t worry” this food is kosher.

    We should understand that the very same principle applies to the issur de’oraisa of wearing shatnez. The eino Yehudi simply does not have ne’emanus.

    Therefore, since there is a safek de’oraisa regarding the suit in question [with a special rai’isa that Hong Kong tailors are notorious for slipping in linen in hidden places], the suit can’t be worn until this safek is resolved by having a reliable shatnez expert verify the halachic status of the suit.

  2. I once bought a suit from this guy I took it to check for sahtnez not only did they tell me that a lot of his suits contain shatnez but they are not wool either

  3. The tag shown in the article comes from a custom-made shirt, not from a suit. Was this the exact label attached to the suit which was found to have shatnez?

    Do custom made shirts need to be checked for shatnez?

    I understand that even linen shirts generally do not contain any WOOL.

  4. Hi Scammed,

    Remember, that shatnez is only if there is a mixture of wool and linen.

    Sooooo…….the good part of being scammed is that if the suit isn’t really wool, then there shouldn’t be a problem of shatnez!