The Most Ungrateful New Yorker

18

nypdFrom the New York Post Editorial Board:

Back in 2011, the day after a Queens man reported his Honda Civic stolen, New York’s Finest found it and returned it to him.

Two months later, the same man was driving along the Van Wyck service road with his 11-year-old son when an NYPD vehicle cut him off at an intersection. Three other police cars surround the car, and officers approach with guns drawn.

After 30 minutes, the officers realize the man was telling the truth: It is his car. The mishap occurred because no one had taken the car off the stolen list.

In a sensible world, all parties would have had a good chuckle. The man and his son would have had an adventure. And the police would have taken the car off the stolen list so it didn’t happen again.

But this is not a sensible world. This is litigious New York. And here a clerical error becomes a federal case.

The man’s name is Clinton Pittman, and he is suing the city, former Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly and other police officers in federal court. Pittman claims he and his son “continue to suffer substantial mental and emotional harm” from the incident.

So proving no good deed goes unpunished, an NYPD that recovered this citizen’s car now finds itself sued. We appreciate no one enjoys being stopped by police.

But not only did our cops do their job when they recovered Pittman’s car, they were still doing their job when they pulled him over – because the car was listed as stolen.

Far better than a lawsuit would have been this: Thank you for being so diligent.

THE NEW YORK POST

{Matzav.com Newscenter}

18 COMMENTS

  1. Because if a civilian made such a mistake against the cops the cops would just apoligize and laugh it off…,

  2. SINCE AMERICA SOMETIMES REWARD OUTRAGEOUS AMOUNTS TO PEOPLE WHO SUE OTHERS ; SO THE MENTALITY IS THAT AT THE FIRST OPPORTUNITY GO FOR IT AND SUE BECAUSE THEN YOU HAVE A CHANCE (BETTER THAN THGE LOTTERY TO MAKE AN EASY BUCK…..

  3. but the one in charge of removing the car MUST BE FIRED

    THINK OF THE POTENTIAL CATASTROPHE THAT
    COULD’VE OCCURED BECAUSE OF THIS NEGLIGENCE.

    iF THE CAR OWNER MOVED ONE INCH THE WORNG WAY
    and the cop was just off another dangerous case where a shooting was involved….
    who knows what the cops could’ve done to the innocent…
    *all because of sloppy accounting…

    NO FORGIVENESS!
    REMOVE THAT PERSON AT ONCE.

  4. Brought to you by the good people who wondered if killing an alleged slumlord wasn’t so bad.

    Anyone would have been frightened out of their wits, and unfortunately certain government agencies don’t improve their performance without suits.

  5. Our Ford Mustang was stolen, five doors away from our building, in April about 20 years ago. I promptly notified the 66th Precinct, the insurance company, et al. Nothing further until the next November, when I received a notice from a local towing company to come and pick up our stolen vehicle, which they had towed after it had been ticketed by the police on the Prospect Park Expressway five times!
    When they drove me to the “dead cars” field, I saw that it would not be worth the cost of properly repairing our car – which evidently had been taken for a joy ride -and went back to their shop to retrieve my seforim which they had, and say goodbye. They asked about payment for the towing, and my reply was, whoever ordered it towed (the NYPD) should pay. I smiled, they shrugged, end of story.

  6. It’s appalling that ny post can take such an attitude. It’s surprising that some readers here get swept in by it. That’s not an acceptable mistake. No innocent should be pulled over by multiple officers and cars with guns drawn. So, it’s ok to imprison people too as long as police are doing their job – even when we later find out it was a mistaken arrest and the prisoner had always been innocent? Would that nyp reporter still feel the same had he been the victim of police brutality or intimidation due to someone’s clerical error? Shame on you again New York post, selling away your ethics to the devil just to make a story!

  7. There are two separate issues here.
    1) gratitude to the NYPD
    2) the right of the innocent not to be put through emotional anguish of a police ambush.

    The driver may have gratitude to the NYPD for finding his car, but that doesn’t exempt the NYPD from negligence. 30 minutes is like eternity. No one should have to be put through what Mr. Pittman went through!

  8. #10, cute!
    The judge should not only throw the case out, he/she ought make him pay court fees and the city’s legal fees! That will teach all a lesson!
    (#9, you have a good memory!)

  9. A real shocker for some people: NYPD is not its own entity that though doesn’t have to, may magnanimously recover your stolen car – the actual reason for NYPD’s existence is not to consume our tax money in the form of doughnuts, not to park illegally in front of doughnut shops, and not to run red lights when dangerously low on doughnut supplies, but to serve their tax paying employer by providing law enforcement including recovery of stolen property.
    As far as being surrounded by a bunch of men with guns drawn: you just might be safer if the above gunmen were plain criminals and not cops – there is a slight chance that criminals may consider a possible life sentence and not pull the trigger, 40 bullets firing cops are almost never criminally prosecuted and act with arrogant brassiness.
    Gratitude to cops? How about cops having gratitude to taxpayers – err.. forget the cops having gratitude – how about cops just not dissing the taxpayer by not acting like they are above the law they were hired to enforce.

  10. I think the car’s owner was justifiably traumatized by the police to sue. Knowing the track record of police who sometimes shoot innocent people, I think he is right. The police when returning his car should have made a record of the fact so it shouldn’t be mistaken as stolen after it was returned.

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