Today’s Yahrtzeits & History – 12 Kislev


flicker_100393Ravina II Bar Shmuel (c. 475), who completed the codification of the Talmud Bavli begun earlier by Rav Ashi. His petirah marks the end of the period of Amoraim.

Rav Shlomo Luria Ashkenazi, the Maharshal (1510-1574) of Lublin; author of the Yam Shel Shlomo, a halachic commentary on 16 tractates of the Talmud (only 7 of which are still extant). His Chochmas Shlomo, glosses on the text of the Talmud and comments, is printed in the standard editions of the Talmud.

Rav Yitzchak Lampronti (1679-1756), author of Pachad Yitzchak, the first major Talmudic encyclopedia ever assembled. He was also moreh tzedek in Ferera, Italy, and the teacher of the Ramchal.

Rav Avraham Dov Auerbach of Avritch and Tzefas (1765-1840). He was a disciple of Rav Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev and the first two Rebbes of Chernobyl. Rebbe of Avritch from 1785, he moved to Tzefas in 1830 at the age of 65. He is the author of Bas Ayin, a commentary on Chumash. In the deadly earthquake of 24 Tevet 5597 (January 1, 1837), 5,000 people lost their lives, of whom 4,000 were Jews. Although most of the shul of the Avritcher Rebbe collapsed, the part where the men were clustered remained upright and everyone was saved. He is buried in the old cemetery of Tzefas.

Rav Yehoshua Moshe Aharonson of Petach Tikva (1910-1993). Born in Warsaw, he was was named rabbi of Sanok in 1937. In the winter of early 1940, he was appointed to the Beis Din of Warsaw. In March 1942, he was deported to the Konin labor camp, near Chelmno. The Konin camp was liquidated in the summer of 1943. Rabbi Aharonson was taken to Hohensalza, and afterwards to Auschwitz 3 (Buna). In 1945 he was transferred from Auschwitz to Buchenwald and then taken on a death march to Theresienstadt, where he was liberated. He subsequently moved to Eretz Israel, where he served as a rabbi in Petach Tikva and Emmanuel. His writings were collected in the book Alei Merorot.

Today in History – 12 Kislev    

·       Mohamed Ibn Farouk, the governor of Yerushalayim, was deposed, 1626. Sadly, his successors were not much friendlier to the local Jews than he.
·       Shabsai Tzvi’s primary public relations figure, Nathan of Gaza, who had not followed his master into Islam, was excommunicated by the rabbinical council in Constantinople, 1666.
·       Rav Avraham Dov Avritsh, author of Bas Ayin, among the last of those to perish in a plague in Tzefas which ended shortly after his passing, 1841.

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