Today’s Yahrtzeits & History – 3 Sivan


yahrtzeit-candlesRav Yosef Irgas, Italian Kabbalist, author of Divrei Yosef, and Shomer Emunim, 1730.

Rav Yaakov Shimshon of Shpitivka (1801). He was a disciple of the Maggid of Mezhrech and a close friend of Rav Baruch of Mezhbez. He succeeded his father as rabbi in Shepetovka, but in 1799 he settled in Tiberias where he met Rav Nachman of Breslav. He died in Tiberias.

Rav Yisrael Tzvi of Koson, the Ohr Moleh (1944)

Rav Eliyahu Munk of Paris (1949). Author of The Call of the Torah, The World of Prayer, and The Seven Days of the Beginning. In the latter book, in which he cites Rav Dovid Zvi Hoffmann, and explains Creation as taking longer than six literal days. He also wrote The Just Lives By His Faith, a collection of essays written to explain difficult concepts in Judaism. One of his daughters, Amalie, married Rav Immanuel Jakobovits (the future Chief Rabbi in England) in 1949. Another married Rav Chaim Fasman, Rosh Kollel in Los Angeles.

Rav Chaim Yitzchok Korb (1870-1957). Born in the small Latvian town of Piltin, Courland, he entered the Telshe Yeshiva at the young age of 16. He married Leah Miriam, daughter of Rav Moshe Yitzchok Rabin (author of Miluim l’Moshe on Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah and Rosh Yeshiva and dayan in Ponovezh). After his chasuna, he remained in Ponovezh near his father-in-law. In 1909, Rav Chaim Yitzchok assumed his father-in-law’s position as dayan in the community. Eventually he left Ponovezh and became Rav in the city of Palangin, Lithuania. From there he became Rav and Rosh Yeshiva in Pavlograd, Ukraine, and then in Zager. In 1926, Rav Chaim Yitzchok immigrated to the United States, assuming the position of Rav at the Beis Medrash Hagadol of Harlem. His sefer Nesivos Chaim was published at this period in his life. Two years later, he accepted the position of Rosh Yeshiva of Beis Medrash L’Torah of Chicago. For over 20 years, Rav Korb delivered intensive shiurim in Talmud and halacha. Every day he would arrive at 3:00am to learn. He would remain in the yeshiva the entire day until 10:00pm when he would return home. Every day he spent 17 hours in the yeshiva. In 1947, Rav Chaim Yitzchok sustained a difficult blow with the passing of his wife of 51 years, Rebbetzin Leah Miriam. Two years later, Rav Chaim Yitzchok moved to Eretz Yisroel, where he stayed until his petira.

Today in History – 3 Sivan

· The first deportation of Eretz Yisrael Jews to Babylonia took place in 391 B.C.E. A large proportion of the yidden in Eretz Yisrael’s followed them to Babylonia 11 years later, in 380 B.C.E. The first return of some Babylonian Jews to Eretz Yisrael took place in c. 360 B.C.E. The majority, however, remained in Babylonia, where they were led by a Jewish Exilarch and the Jewish sages who presided over large yeshivos there – the Amoraim, Rabbanon Savorai, and Gaonim. It was not until 1951, close to 2,350 years after the arrival of the first Jewish deportees in Babylonia, that this ancient Jewish community began its own liquidation through aliya to Israel.
· Vespasian captured Jericho and killed its inhabitants 68C.E.
· Massacre of the Jews of Mainz, 1096, commemorated in the Kinah “Mi Yitein Roshi Mayim” by Rav Kalonymus ben Yehuda.
· The Rambam and his family reached Acco after a hazardous voyage from North Africa, 1165. He observed the anniversary of his arrival in Eretz Yisrael as a holiday.
· Anti-Jewish riots broke out in Warsaw, 1790.
· Colonel Dovid Marcus, the American Jewish defender of Jerusalem, was killed at Abu Ghosh six hours before a cease-fire was to go into effect, 1948.
· Operation Ezra and Nechemia brings Iraqi Jews to Israel, 1950.

{Manny Newscenter}


  1. The deportation of Jews to Babylonia occurred in 586 BCE under the rule of Nebuchadnezzar.

    The ‘seventy years’ are NOT the time between Temples, but rather the time between the destruction of the first and the beginning of the return of the jewish exiles

    Good Yom tov

  2. Rav Yosef Irgas’ Shomer Emunin (kadmon), is an introduction to Kabbalah. The format he uses is similar to that of the Kuzari; a dialog in which a rationalist -shealtiel inquires about Kabbalah and is answered by a Mekubal – Yehoyadah.