Watch: Dr. Meir Wikler: Keep Your Children Out of The Psychotherapist’s Office

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In the following video, Dr. Meir Wikler shares the one thing parents can do to ensure that their children grow up emotionally healthy and well adjusted, and don’t end up in a therapist’s office.

Dr. Wikler is a longtime therapist who lives in Brooklyn.

WATCH:


{Matzav.com}

4 COMMENTS

  1. This therapist is interesting. I would wonder if all the issues in parenting make all the kids seek therapy.

    Still, a good therapist is more than crucial to a community. They are not a crutch to help the poor family restrain its own poor instincts. They should serve as a human voice for the soul to reflect on Torah and human endeavor.

    He should have many patients.

  2. Please summarize this video and its advice. Actually when I read the title, I was thinking that perhaps “the one thing” (most important thing) is blocking youtube 😉

  3. http://www.jewishmediaresources.com/1217/turbulent-times-zurich-style

    Read full article. Here is an excerpt that brings out Dr. Wikler’s point

    ANOTHER ADVANTAGE SWITZERLAND possesses is a plethora of kosher activities that can be experienced by the entire family. The country’s famed natural beauty is everywhere visible, and scenic walks and bicycle rides are easily accessible within an hour of Zurich (which itself nestles between mountains and has a beautiful lake.)

    Jewish parents and children spend a lot of quality time together. Family excursions are a regular event on Sunday afternoons. Most families spend a couple of weeks in the summer in rented quarters in the mountains, where minyanim spring up like daisies, and a shorter period during the winter school break. An old chavrusah described to me coming to an open meadow at the end of a mountain climb and finding a large chareidi family standing there reciting Tehillim.

    Sports are participatory in Switzerland, not a matter of cheering teams in stadiums. Everywhere we went, we encountered hikers, bicyclers, and runners. The activity starts young – often in a pack on the mother or father’s back – and continues into old age. My wife and I were passed by more than one octogenarian on winding alpine trails.

    This wholesome physical activity has not passed by the Jewish community. Virtually every boy, including those in Yeshiva L’Tzeirim, ride bicycles or small scooters to school. Teenage boys have plenty of healthy ways to work off excess energy

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