One Blood Type Is Least Susceptible To Coronavirus

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Early results of a new study conducted by genetic testing giant 23andMe suggest a person’s blood type affects how susceptible they are to the coronavirus — and that those with Type O appear to be the least at risk.

Preliminary data from the study — which is still underway and includes 750,000 participants, including 10,000 who told the company they had COVID-19 — indicates that people with Type O blood are between 9 and 18 percent less likely than those with other blood types to have tested positive for the disease.

There appeared to be little difference among other blood types, according to the research, which only examined susceptibility and not severity of the illness.

Read more at NY POST.

{Matzav.com}

6 COMMENTS

  1. Except that that statistic is almost irrelevant. What does 18% less likely mean when it comes to a virus that is very catchy? I was exposed directly, in-house, for the entire duration of the illness, to my brother in law who had a very bad “mild” case, and is type O positive. I did not catch it, I did not feel sick, and I do not have ANY antibodies. I’m blood type B positive, by the way. And over 50 years old. Apparently there are too many factors to count at this point.

    If you are high risk due to age, or medical issues, “18% less likely” doesn’t actually protect you in an environment where a catchy virus is spreading. What’s more important, in my opinion, is how risky is that virus for me, and how much is it currently circulating.

    There is a lack of clarity on whether antibodies will result in immunity for an extended period of time. However, it does seem pretty obvious in the Brooklyn, Lakewood, and Monsey frum communities that a high percentage of people already had covid 19, and it does not seem that anyone is getting it twice at this time.
    So it’s not currently “spreading”, the way it was 2 and 3 months ago – IN THESE COMMUNITIES.

    Just saying.

    • Had it been “very catchy” you’d have gotten it too. It’s not contagious at all by contact as families don’t catch it even though one member can be very sick. You can only catch it if you happen to be in the neighborhood where it was spread in the air, mostly in frum Jewish neighborhoods.

    • people are also aware of ways to prevent transmission. and also not to mention shutting down public meetings also

  2. “So it’s not currently “spreading”, the way it was 2 and 3 months ago – IN THESE COMMUNITIES.”

    Not yet…… shomer pisaim Hashem

  3. 18% less likely lowers the risk. If we would analyze all the risk factors properly the way the Torah does instead of the way the cdc does then everything would be taken into account including “anecdotal evidence” and studies that the fda and cdc “don’t agree with” and come up with an accurate risk level and then and only then can a posek or rov or gadol batorah decide how to open and close shuls and yeshivos. Until that is done this whole situation is one big chillul hashem. When the torah leaders are not using the Torah to decide that’s a chillul hashem. Cops breaking up a minyan is not a chillul hashem. עיין רש״י שמות כא א

  4. 18% less likely lowers the risk. If we would analyze all the risk factors properly the way the Torah does instead of the way the cdc does then everything would be taken into account including “anecdotal evidence” and studies that the fda and cdc “don’t agree with” and come up with an accurate risk level and then and only then can a posek or rov or gadol batorah decide how to open and close shuls and yeshivos. Until that is done this whole situation is one big chillul hashem. When the torah leaders are not using the Torah to decide that’s a chillul hashem. Cops breaking up a minyan is not a chillul hashem. עיין רש״י שמות כא א

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