1,000-Year-Old Kesubah Goes On Display In Yerushalayim


KESUBAHThe National Library of Israel is launching an exhibition about the kesubah, the Jewish marriage contract, featuring a rare 1,000-year-old kesubah that testifies to the presence of a Jewish community in 11th century Tzefas.

The kesubah, written in Aramaic, has been dated to Nov. 28, 1023. It was written in what was then the city of Tzur. The sofer is named as Yosef Hakohein, son of Yaakov, and the couple is named as Nosson Hakohein, son of Shlomo, and Rochel, from Tzefas.

“This is one of the first and only existing artifacts that testifies to the Jewish community in Tzefas during that period,” said Dr. Yoel Finkelman, the National Library’s Judaica curator.

{Matzav.com Israel}


  1. I wish the names had been atypical so as to show that they weren’t so, so makpid with name-spelling back then. They only became crazy makpid since Galus America came to be! Names like Fraady and Hentchie were not names then: neither were Lipa and Eiberr.