Gerber Expands Kosher Baby Food Offerings, Launches Kosher 2nd Foods Fruit & Vegetable Purees


gerberGerber Products, a part of Nestlé Nutrition, is introducing a line of purees that are certified kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). These new purees products, available in ten of Gerber’s most popular flavors, provide a kosher option for parents who want to feed their babies with a most trusted brand in baby food.

Product details include:
– Flavor Varieties: Ten great tasting flavors certified by the Orthodox Union (OU): Applesauce, Pears, Bananas, Apple Strawberry Banana, Apple Blueberry, Sweet Potato, Carrots, Squash, Green Beans and Peas.
– Nutritional Profile: Made with 100 percent natural fruit and vegetable puree and no added sugar, salt, starch, artificial colors or flavors. Many of these products provide an excellent source of Vitamin A or C.
– Product Availability: Available nationwide this Spring, and packaged in Gerber’s classic 4 oz glass jars.

“These purees are the latest Gerber products to carry the OU symbol, joining select infant cereals, juices and Graduates snacks,” said Cathy Abramski, Senior Marketing Manager for Nestlé Nutrition. “We are committed to helping parents make good nutritional choices for their children. One of the best ways we can do this is by offering them a variety of options for each stage of their children’s development from infancy through preschool.”

“We are proud to partner with Gerber on their new line of kosher purees. These new varieties expand the range of kosher products for parents who want to provide their babies with nutritious, certified kosher food,” said Rabbi Eliyahu Safran, Vice President of Communications and Marketing for the Orthodox Union Kosher Division.

Delivering the high level of quality that consumers expect from Gerber, the new line of certified kosher purees provide the nutrition that growing infants’ need, while introducing them to new tastes as they grow and develop.

{Elisha Newscenter}


  1. Funny because I thought that this company was doing away with their kosher products, or could that have been Beechnut?