Bloomberg: Low Census Numbers for Brooklyn “Don’t Make Sense At All”

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bloomberg-book-smallManhattan’s population has swelled to 1,585,873, according to the latest census data – a more than 3 percent gain from a decade ago.According to the data released Thursday, New York City’s population now stands at 8,175,133 people – the highest number in history, city officials said.

But the number falls significantly short of the city’s Department of Planning estimate of 8.4 million, leading officials to suspect that the census bureau significantly undercounted the number of city residents. They warn that the city will lose hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funding as a result.

Joseph Salvo, the city’s chief demographer, raised concerns about a serious under-count in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. The Census numbers, for instance, show that the population of Queens has increased by only 0.1 percent, or 1,300 people, over the past 10 years – while Brooklyn is counted as having grown by just 1.6 percent.

City officials said that number doesn’t jibe with what they believe to be true.

“It doesn’t make any sense at all,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who was among the city officials who received the data ahead of the public release. “The numbers are totally incongruous.”

Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz also voiced his disbelief.

“I’ve got to tell you, I’m flabbergasted by these numbers, Mr. Mayor. I think they made a big, big mistake,” he said.

City officials said there is nothing they can do to challenge the numbers.

The numbers show the city now comprises 42.2 percent of the total population of the state, Joseph Salvo, the city’s chief demographer, said.

The numbers also show that in the last 10 years, Manhattan’s population has shifted. The Financial District and the Hudson Yards have seen substantial growth, as have north-central Harlem and almost the entire east side of the island.

Washington Heights, meanwhile, has lost between 5,000 to 10,000 people. But, Salvo cautioned that because of the area’s large residential population, the decline amounts to only about 2 percent.

Other neighborhoods that have also seen declines are the Upper West Side and the wealthy western side of the Upper East Side.

City officials estimated the under-count to range from about 2.7 to 2.8 percent, and blamed the city’s hard-to-count housing and large immigrant populations for the misses.

Salvo noted that the census bureau classified a high number of residences as “vacant” in immigrant-heavy areas of Southern Brooklyn and Queens, suggesting that census counters may have knocked on occupied doors that were never answered.

There is no way to formally challenge the results, he said.

The city’s overall response rate was 63 percent.

{DNA Info/Matzav.com Newscenter}

3 COMMENTS

  1. “It doesn’t make any sense at all,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who was among the city officials who received the data ahead of the public release. “The numbers are totally incongruous.”

    Well duh! With an illigal 3rd term the Mayor imposed on us, what do you expect?! Smart people are leaving in droves! His denial won’t change the facts! It’s high time Lord Mike, high tails it out of here!

  2. It’s assur to give the treife medina any information about frum yidden. So of course the numbers are low.

    Veiter, it’s probably anti-semitism that is fueling this obvious lie to deprive the frum yidden their needed services.

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