World’s Largest Kneidel Weighing Astounding 267 Pounds Unveiled At New York Deli

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kneidelA “Kosher Koncoction” unlike anything ever seen, the world’s largest matzo ball, weighing in at an astounding 267 pounds, was unveiled today on the streets of New York to celebrate an upcoming basketball game between the New York Knicks and a team from Israel to benefit the world’s largest orphanage. Officials from the New York Knicks, Israel’s largest orphanage, specialized chefs who worked for three months to create the behemoth ball gathered with NYPD police officers who escorted the oversized matzo monster from a special oversized kitchen in New Jersey, where the sumo-sized ball was created. After it was unveiled and measured amidst a cheering crowd of families and children, the ball found how short-lived fame is as it was cut into bite sized pieces and shared with the throngs gathered to witness history being made and then consumed. Leftovers were donated to a Brooklyn soup kitchen.The massive round mound of matzo was trucked with police escort from a specially designed 100-gallon kettle in New Jersey where it slow boiled for two days by a team of a dozen chefs before being lifted by a custom designed “soup sling” by two dozen helpers into a large protective crate before being transported in a 24-foot freightliner through the streets of New York to its ultimate unveiling and measurement for the world record.

It was all to celebrate an upcoming basketball game, which will be played on October 18 at Madison Square Garden between the New York Knicks and Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv benefiting Migdal Ohr, the world’s largest orphanage in Northern Israel and home to nearly 7,000 orphaned, impoverished, underprivileged and new immigrant children.

Robert Katz, executive vice president of the American Friends of Migdal Ohr, said that when these teams played two years ago, it was the most successful exhibition basketball game in the history of the Garden. In 2005, Maccabi became the first international team to win on North American soil when they defeated the Toronto Raptors at Air Canada Centre.

“Everyone had a ball the last time we did this,” Katz said. “We figured why not have a ball – literally – this time made out of matzo to celebrate this amazing game coming up? The opportunity for everyone to participate in the festivities of the October game with the Knicks began today.”

The Guinness record-setting caloric colossus baked by Noah’s Ark Original Deli, stood three feet high and required an army of hens working around the clock to provide 1,000 eggs, combined with 80 pounds of margarine, with 200 pounds of matzo meal and 20 pounds of chicken base.

Noam Sokolow, owner of Noah’s Ark, who directed the planning and “deli development” of the behemoth ball, said, “This culinary caper really was all about making the impossible possible. Yes, Noah’s Ark has been voted the best corned beef sandwich in the United States, but now we’ve created something that helps more than an appetite … it helps draw attention to at-risk children.”

Rav Yitzchok Dovid Grossman founded Migdal Ohr in 1972 with 18 children in a small one-story building in Northern Israel. Today Migdal Ohr is roughly the size of the Columbia University campus, where each day thousands of children from all over the world are fed, clothed, housed, educated and nurtured on to productive lives. Migdal Ohr runs a network of schools, providing academic and vocational studies while integrating new immigrant children into Israeli society through specialized curricula and after-school programs.

{Noam Amdurski-Matzav.com Newscenter}

6 COMMENTS

  1. We have to be careful with regard to using food for stunts, as our faith enjoins us not to treat food, from which we receive vital nourishment, direspectfully.

    In this case, boruch Hashem, I was happy to see that the food was not wasted or treated particularly disrespectfully, as sometimes occurs with such stunts. Nevertheless, I think poskim should be consulted when contemplating certain activities using food in non-traditional ways.

    Something related, which is very problematic, is eating contests, which have infiltrated the frum world at times from outside, in imitation of famous events like the annual July 4th (non-kosher) hot dog eating contest at Coney Island. In the case of such competitions, I believe that they are unequivocally ossur, for more than one reason, for example, 1) bizoyon ochlin, 2) extremely rapid ingestion of large quantities of food is injurious to the health of competitors, 3) some of the food is usually wasted.

  2. The Madison Square Garden website is already selling tickets to this event; good that it is for Migdal Ohr, but the tickets are expensive. What percent actually goes to the tzedaka?

  3. “Nevertheless, I think poskim should be consulted when contemplating certain activities using food in non-traditional ways.”
    Really? Why? What was done here that could have been construed as even remotely a “bizayon” to food? First off, we’re talking about a matzo ball here; that ain’t “food”, sorry to inform you. It’s an artificial concoction made up of matza meal and margarine and the less we eat of that kind of thing, the better. Secondly, they rolled it out, looked at it, cheered, and then ate it. A bizayon? Of course not.
    While we’re on the topic of asking busy poskim our cooked-up questions, ask the following: may we brush our teeth? Yes? How do we know? What’s the makor for it? May we floss our teeth? Yes? How do we know? These are all modern-day inventions, and we all know how bad and awful modernity is.
    There was no bazayon here. This was not a stuff-your-face contest, which are insulting to humanity, I concede. It was a giant matza ball. Lighten up. Relax. It’s the summertime. You want to fight those terrible “outside influences”? I have news for you: we’ve had those influences as part of our people for thousands of years already. Stop blaming the web and the outside world for our pettiness, hatred of the “other” though he’s our brother, incivility, systemic corruption and deceit, and for the horrible way we have treated our children the past 50 years, well before the internet. V’hamayvin yavin.

  4. “I have news for you: we’ve had those influences as part of our people for thousands of years already. Stop blaming the web and the outside world for our pettiness, hatred of the “other” though he’s our brother, incivility, systemic corruption and deceit, and for the horrible way we have treated our children the past 50 years, well before the internet. V’hamayvin yavin.”

    Absolutely. At least as far as trying to shift the blame for our own poor midos.

    All the same (maybe I am being too temimusdik) I would hope that the matzav is not as bad as you make it sound (“hatred of the ‘other’…the horrible way WE [my emphasis– not all of us are guilty of that!] have treated our children…”)

    Kol tuv.

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